Evolutionary Ecology
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Justyna Wolinska

PD Dr. Justyna Wolinska

Assistant Professor

Contact

LMU München/Department Biology II
Evolutionary Ecology
Großhaderner Str. 2
82152 Planegg-Martinsried

Phone: +49 89 2180 74-201
Fax: +49 89 2180 74-204

Open positions

PhD student position (download .pdf)
Postdoc position (download .pdf)

Research

We are evolutionary ecologists who study rapid evolutionary changes in natural populations and communities, as a response to environmental challenges. Our research interests fall into three categories:

1) Mechanisms underlying host-parasite coevolution and the consequences of environmental changes for the coevolutionary process. We study how coevolution affects ecological processes, such as the maintenance of diversity, on population and community levels, and how this biodiversity is maintained in the face of global environmental change. While the host-parasite coevolution provides the perfect empirical framework within which to study rapid evolution, we explore other strong evolutionary forces that allow rapid adaptation to new environments, such as 2) species hybridization, and 3) phenotypic plasticity (in particular inducible defenses).

In general, our research seeks to link ecology with evolutionary biology and genetics. To detect rapid evolutionary change, we use several empirical approaches. In field studies of natural populations we are exploring the links between coevolution and genetic diversity, as well as between environmental components and the occurrence of disease. Specifically, we are tracking genetic changes in populations and communities (with a focus on coevolving partners and hybridizing host species) over both time and space. These genetic changes are tracked by employing molecular approaches, e.g. next-generation-sequencing. Another part of our research involves experimental coevolution (single-generation experiments, as well as long-term surveys in microcosms).

 

For individual projects go to "Research"

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Keywords

coevolution, Daphnia, frequency-dependence, hybridization, hybrid fitness, parasitism, phenotypic plasticity, Red Queen

wolinska4_sampling_alps2   wolinska5_sampling_indiana2
Sampling in the Alps and ....                                                    ... in Indiana

Daphnia with brood parasiteDaphnia with gut parasiteDaphnia with water mould
wolinska1_d_infected_with_brood_par wolinska2_d_infected_with_gut_par wolinska3_d_infected_with_water_mould

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CV

(CV as PDF, 53 kB)

Education

  • 2012 Habilitation, Evolutionary Ecology, LMU Munich, Germany
  • 2006 PhD, Eawag/ETH (Department of Aquatic Ecology), Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2002 MSc, Jagiellonian University (Department of Hydrobiology), Krakow, Poland
  • 1999 BSc, Jagiellonian University (Environmental Chemistry), Krakow, Poland

Academic and Research Appointments

  • Assistant Professor, LMU Munich, Germany, 2008-present

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA, 2006-2008
    (with Prof. C. Lively and Prof. M. Lynch)

 

Scientific grants

2013-2016: DFG
(proposal integrated within a Priority Program: Host-parasite coevolution; rapid reciprocal

adaptation and its genetic basis): “Red Queen dynamics in Daphnia; revealing evolutionary change in
a parasite population”

2012-2015: DFG & SNF (German-Swiss collaboration project): “Host-parasites interactions in Daphnia: the
role of variable environments”. Co-PI (Swiss part): PD Dr. Piet Spaak(Eawag/ETH Zurich).

2012-2015: DFG (proposal integrated within a Research Unit: Selection in structured populations): “The role
of hybridization in the colonization of newly opened habitats”

2010-2013: DFG: “Facing multiple enemies: trade-offs between adaptive responses to predators and
parasites in the context of inducible defences”. Co-PI: Prof. Christian Laforsch (Universität Bayreuth).

2010-2013: Bayerische Elite Förderung (PhD stipend): “The effect of multiple stressors on Daphnia”. Co-
PI: Prof. Christian Laforsch (Universität Bayreuth).

2010-2013: DFG (proposal integrated within a Priority Program: Host-parasite coevolution; rapid reciprocal
adaptation and its genetic basis): “Red Queen dynamics in Daphnia: the role of variable environments.
Part 2”.

2009-2010: DFG: “Red Queen dynamics in Daphnia: the role of variable environments.

Other grants (I helped to write and / or to defend these proposals in front of the funding committee)
2010-2013: VW-Stiftung: International Master Program in Ecology, Evolution and Systematics (EES)
2010-2014: EU funding: International Master Program in Evolutionary Biology (Erasmus Mundus); partner
universities: Munich, Groningen, Uppsala, Montpellier and Harvard

Academic and Professional Service

Reviewer duties
Scientific journals: Evolution, Ecology, Am Nat, Proc R Soc B, Mol Ecol, PLoS ONE, Funct Ecol, Evol
Ecol, Ecol Res, BMC Evol Biol, BMC Biology, Int J Parasitol, J Anim Ecol, Oecologia, Oikos, Biol
Invasions, FEMS Microbiol Ecol, Freshw Biol, Parasitology, Dis Aquat Org, J Eukaryot Microbiol, Aquat
Biol, Aquat Ecol, Aquat Sci, Hydrobiologia, Arch Hydrobiol, Acta Zool, Acta Zool Acad Sci Hung,
Sensors
Funding agencies: National Science Foundations (in Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Israel,
Poland and USA), National Geographic Society (USA), Graduate Women in Science (USA)
Editorial activities
Editorial Board, Journal of Evolutionary Biology (since 2010)
Duties and responsibilities at LMU Munich
Board of Directors for the International Master Program, EES (2008-present)
Admission Committee for the International Master Program, EES (2008-present)
Admission Committee for the International Master Program, Erasmus Mundus (2010-present)
Organization committee
ESEB conference, Lisbon, Portugal, 2013 – Symposium: “Evolution of symbiotic interactions in
communities: novel approach”
International Summer School on Host-parasite coevolution, Chiemsee, Germany, 2009
7th International Symposium on Cladocera, Herzberg, Switzerland, 2005

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Publications

32. Giessler S., and J. Wolinska. 2013. Capturing the population structure of microparasites: using ITS-sequence data and a pooled DNA approach. Molecular Ecology Resources. 13: 918-928.

31. Engelbrecht W., O. Hesse, J. Wolinska and C. Laforsch. 2013. Two threats at once: encounters with predator cueas alter host life-history and morphological responses to parasite spores. Hydrobiologia. 715: 93-100.

30. Hesse O., W. Engelbrecht, C. Laforsch, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Fighting parasites and predators: How to deal with multiple threats? BMC Ecology. 12:12.

29. Buser C.C., P. Spaak, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Disease and pollution alter Daphnia taxonomic and clonal structure in experimental assemblages. Freshwater Biology. 57: 1865-1874

30. Hesse O., W. Engelbrecht, C. Laforsch, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Fighting parasites and predators: How to deal with multiple threats? BMC Ecology. In press.

29. Buser C.C., P. Spaak, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Disease and pollution alter Daphnia taxonomic and clonal structure in experimental assemblages. Freshwater Biology. In press.

28. Yin M., A. Petrusek, J. Seda, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Fine-scale temporal and spatial variation of taxon and clonal structure in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex in heterogeneous environments. BMC Evolutionary Biology. 12: 12.

27. Leung T.L.F., K.C. King, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Escape from the Red Queen: an overlooked scenario in coevolutionary studies. Oikos. 121: 641-645.

26. Weigl S., H. Koerner, A. Petrusek, J. Seda, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Natural distribution and co-infection patterns of microsporidia parasites in the Daphnia longispina complex. Parasitology. 139: 870-880.

25. Yin M., A. Petrusek, J. Seda, and J. Wolinska. 2012. Fine-scale genetic analysis of Daphnia host populations infected by two virulent parasites – strong fluctuations in clonal structure at small temporal and spatial scales. International Journal for Parasitology. 42: 115-121.

24. Wolinska J., J. Seda, H. Koerner, P. Smilauer, and A. Petrusek. 2011. Spatial variation of Daphnia parasite load within individual waterbodies. Journal of Plankton Research 33:1284-1294.

23. Yin M., C. Laforsch, J. Lohr, and J. Wolinska. 2011. Predator-induced defence makes Daphnia more vulnerable to parasites. Evolution 65:1482-1488.

22. Schoebel C.N., C. Tellenbach, P. Spaak, and J. Wolinska. 2011. Temperature effects on parasite prevalence in a natural hybrid complex. Biology Letters 7:108-111.

21. Wolinska J., P. Spaak, A. Petrusek, H. Koerner, J. Seda, and S. Giessler. 2011. Transmission mode affects the population genetic structure of Daphnia parasites. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 24:265-273.

20. Schoebel C.N., J. Wolinska, and P. Spaak. 2010. Higher parasite resistance in Daphnia populations with recent epidemics. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 23:2370-2376.

19. Yin M., J. Wolinska, and S. Giessler. 2010. Clonal diversity, clonal persistence and rapid taxon replacement in natural populations of species and hybrids of the Daphnia longispina complex. Molecular Ecology 19:4168-4178.

18. Lohr J., C. Laforsch, H. Koerner, and J. Wolinska. 2010. A Daphnia parasite (Caullerya mesnili) constitutes a new member of the Ichthyosporea, a group of protists near the animal-fungi divergence. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 53:328-336.

17. Lohr J., M. Yin, and J. Wolinska. 2010. Prior residency does not always pay off – coinfections in Daphnia. Parasitology 137:1493-1500.

16. Wolinska J., S. Giessler, and H. Koerner. 2009. Molecular identification and hidden diversity of novel Daphnia parasites from European lakes. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 75:7051-7059.

15. Wolinska J., and K. C. King. 2009. Environment can alter selection in host-parasite interactions. Trends in Parasitology 25:236-244.

14. Wolinska J., and P. Spaak. 2009. The cost of being common: evidence from natural Daphnia populations. Evolution 63:1893-1901.

13. Wolinska J., K. C. King, F. Vigneux, and C. M. Lively. 2008. Virulence, cultivating conditions, and phylogenetic analyses of oomycete parasites in Daphnia. Parasitology 135:1667-1678. PDF

12. Wolinska J., and C. M. Lively. 2008. The cost of males in Daphnia pulex. Oikos 117:1637-1646. PDF

11. Keller B., J. Wolinska, M. Manca, and P. Spaak. 2008. Spatial, environmental, and anthropogenic effect on the taxon composition of hybridizing Daphnia. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Theme issue Hybridization 363:2943-2952.

10. Wolinska J., C. M. Lively, and P. Spaak. 2008. Parasites in hybridizing communities: the Red Queen again? Trends in Parasitology 24:121-126.

9. Wolinska J., B. Keller, M. Manca, and P. Spaak. 2007. Parasite survey of a Daphnia hybrid complex: host-specificity and environment determine infection. Journal of Animal Ecology 76:191-200.

8. Wolinska J., A. Löffler, and P. Spaak. 2007. Taxon specific reaction norms to predator cues in a hybrid Daphnia complex. Freshwater Biology 52:1198-1209.

7. Keller B., J. Wolinska, C. Tellenbach, and P. Spaak. 2007. Reproductive isolation keeps hybridizing Daphnia species distinct. Limnology and Oceanography 52:984-991.

6. Tellenbach C., J. Wolinska, and P. Spaak. 2007. Epidemiology of a Daphnia brood parasite and its implications on host life-history traits. Oecologia 154:369-375.

5. Wolinska J., K. Bittner, D. Ebert, and P. Spaak. 2006. The coexistence of hybrid and parental Daphnia: the role of parasites. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B-Biological Sciences 273:1977-1983.

4. Fyda J., A. Warren, and J. Wolinska. 2005. An investigation of predator-induced defence responses in ciliated protozoa. Journal of Natural History 39:1431-1442.

3. Lass S., M. Vos, J. Wolinska, and P. Spaak. 2005. Hatching with the enemy: Daphnia diapausing eggs hatch in the presence of fish kairomones. Chemoecology 15:7-12.

2. Wolinska, J., B. Keller, K. Bittner, S. Lass, and P. Spaak. 2004. Do parasites lower Daphnia hybrid fitness? Limnology and Oceanography 49:1401-1407. PDF

1. Löffler, A., J. Wolinska, B. Keller, K. O. Rothhaupt, and P. Spaak. 2004. Life history patterns of parental and hybrid Daphnia differ between lakes. Freshwater Biology 48:1372-1380.

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Collaborators

Curt Lively

Indiana University, Bloomington, USA

Kayla King

University of Liverpool, UK

Adam Petrusek

Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic

Tommy Leung

University of New England, Armidale, Australia

Piet Spaak

Eawag/ETH, Zurich, Switzerland

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PhD students

  • Enrique Tortuero Gonzalez (2013-present, LMU Munich). Red Queen dynamics in Daphnia; revealing evolutionary change in a parasite population.
  • Johanna Griebel (2012-, LMU Munich). The role of hybridization in the colonization of newly opened habitats.
  • Jakub Rusek (2012-, LMU Munich). Host-parasite interactions in Daphnia - the role of variable environments.
  • Wolfgang Engelbrecht (2010-, LMU Munich). Facing multiple enemies: trade-offs between adaptive responses to predators and parasites in the context of inducible defences.
  • Mingbo Yin (2008-2011, LMU Munich). Population structure and host-parasite interactions in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex
  • Claudia Buser (2008-2011, Eawag/ETH Zurich, co-advisor). Dirty water and disease - pesticide mediated interactions between Daphnia and their parasites.
  • Corine Schoebel (2007-2010, Eawag/ETH Zurich, co-advisor). Host-parasite interactions in Daphnia - the role of variable environments